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Did you do your homework ???

do (one’s) homework

1. Literally, to complete the school work that has been assigned by a teacher to be done at home. You can’t watch any more television until you do your homework!

2. To be thoroughly prepared and informed about something or something, especially in advance of some process, action, or decision. Be sure you do your homework before heading into that meeting; there’s a lot at stake, and no one’s going to like it if you aren’t up to speed. I always do my homework before I make big purchases.

do your homework

If you do your homework, you prepare for something, especially by finding out information about it. Before you buy any shares, do your homework. Doing your homework before you make your request will help you to have a confident manner.

do your homework

examine thoroughly the details and background of a subject or topic, especially before giving your own views on it.

do your ˈhomework (on something)

find out the facts, details, etc. of a subject in preparation for a meeting, a speech, an article, etc: He had just not done his homework for the interview. He couldn’t answer our questions.

have you done/did you do your homework?

hi, i find it hard to decide which tense to use when there are no time references. for example, let’s say a teacher walks in the classroom and asks his pupils:”have you done/did you do your homework?”which tense should be used in this situation? i’d use the present perfect but i’m not sure. thanks!

owlman5
Senior Member

The present perfect makes sense in that situation, but the simple past is also possible. Have you done your homework? Did you do your homework?

yuri05
New Member

The present perfect makes sense in that situation, but the simple past is also possible. Have you done your homework? Did you do your homework?

thanks for your reply. so is there a general rule or are the present perfect and the past simple interchangeable whenever there’s no time reference?

Myridon
Senior Member

“Have you done your homework?” This happened in the past, but somehow affects the present.
“Yes.”
“You should give it to the teacher tomorrow.” In this case, we might assume that the recently completed homework can be handed in now. The completion of the homework affects the present.

“Did you do your homework?” This happened in the past. It doesn’t affect the present or we don’t care how it affects the present
“Yes.”
“Why did you do so poorly on the test?” You are thinking about a past effect of doing the homework.